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Advice needed on Filament Runout Sensor filament loading


EnderX
(@enderx)
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I have been struggling with what looks like a simple step in the manual and wonder whether this might be due to a defective part or merely my own clumsiness.

The step I am talking about takes place when installing a new spool. The first printer part the filament need to go through is the filament runout sensor. According to the instructions, it is just a matter of pushing the filament through the hole upward, and grabbing it on the other side, before feeding it to the filament drive gear.

In my hands, the filament always got stuck half way, forcing me to unscrew the sensor assembly from the printer in order to have access to the back side of it, where I was able to push back the spring-loaded arm, letting the filament pass through the whole thing.

It is a minor annoyance, and once done, the remainder of the procedure is a breeze, but clearly this is not the intended approach.

Anyone has any clue of what I may be doing wrong (if anything)? 


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kevin
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@enderx  Maybe you just need to adjust the Angle of push-in. The filament always got stuck because you did not find the tube hole exactly.


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tangerine
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@enderx

I understand your frustration because this happened with my Ender 6 from the first attempt at threading the filament through the filament sensor. I thought there was something wrong with ME that I couldn't do something so simple. I cut the end of the filament at different angles, I tried to push it at different angles, I tried bending the end at different angles.

I contacted the supplier who told me how easy it was to thread the filament which made me feel really special! I managed to get it through a couple of times but then then the microswitch kept tripping maybe five or six times per print and the printer was asking me to change the filament - being new, I thought the sample I was trying to print was multicoloured and it was time for a colour change. Eventually, it was obvious that something was wrong.

I sent them photos showing the LED indicator. In  the end, they agreed to send me a new one and in the meantime advised me to simply disconnect the filament sensor and bypass it, threading the filament directly into the extruder.

I didn't take the sensor apart until I got the replacement and to be honest, I couldn't see anything obviously wrong with it but after fiddling around, I found that by bending the lever on the microswitch slightly away from the filament channel, it allowed the filament through but the switch itself is shot.

Anyway, if it is defective, I think that it must be covered by your warranty.


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EnderX
(@enderx)
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@tangerine That's my feeling as well.

@kevin I am cutting the filament at an angle, as advised by most, and I have tried really hard to wiggle the filament in the hole to "search" for the other side, but I believe the lever arm is too far in the path of the filament. Although I could ty to bend it as @tangerine did, I am afraid it would be easy to overdo it (not mentioning breaking it and voiding the warranty).


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kevin
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@enderx Not sure it is the design flaw or quality issue. Maybe it's best to contact customer service to send you a new one.


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Harkon
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I find that cutting at an angle, straightening the filament, and rolling the fiber in your fingers as you feel it getting stopped finding the exit hold helps a lot.


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EnderX
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@harkon I'll try that next time I change the filament, but I have cut the filament at an angle and wiggled it and try to orient it as best as I could. If rotation is needed, rotation I'll try.

It seems to me that the easiest would be to add a mechanical rocker switch of some kind that pushes the lever away temporarily when inserting the filament, then moves away when not needed.


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Harkon
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@enderxI wouldn't imagine it too terribly difficult to alter it such that the filament is guided through the path without hanging up on anything.

I print from Octoprint mostly and the filament sensor isn't monitored that way anyway, but I've not had any issues threading the filament through it.


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Dogberticus
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@enderx  Okay so I've seen a lot of comments on getting the filament through the filament runout detector, and what I've found out is the following.  The detector can have problems when you try to push the filament straight through it, but a quick fix for this is the twist the filament 360 degrees before potting it through the detector, and then let it rotate around and it will run its way through.  I've tried this multiple times and it works 100% of the time, so it's an easy fix. 🙂

 

This post was modified 4 months ago by Dogberticus

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EnderX
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@dogberticus Sounds like a variation on @harkon trick. Added to the bag of tricks to try with next spool.


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EnderX
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@dogberticus Sounds like a variation on @harkon's trick.

Added to the bag of tricks to try with next spool.


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